JOINT REPLACEMENT SURGERY

Joint Replacement Surgery

Hip joint and knee joint replacements are helping people of all ages live pain- free, active lives.

Joints are formed by the ends of two or more bones connected by tissue called cartilage. Healthy cartilage serves as a protective cushion, allowing smooth, low-friction movement of the joint. If the cartilage becomes damaged by disease or injury, the tissues around the joint become inflamed, causing pain. With time, the cartilage wears away, allowing the rough edges of bone to rub against each other, causing more pain.

When only some of the joint is damaged, a surgeon may be able to repair or replace just the damaged parts. When the entire joint is damaged, a total joint replacement is done. To replace a total hip or knee joint, a surgeon removes the diseased or damaged parts and inserts artificial parts, called prostheses or implants.

Anterior Approach to Hip Replacement

The fellowship-trained surgeons at Louisiana Orthopaedic Specialists provide our patients with the distinct advantage of cumulative team experience in performing Anterior Hip Replacements. This total joint procedure has proven to significantly improve early outcomes and decrease recovery time, allowing patients to return to a normal lifestyle.

Anterior approach to hip replacement surgery conducted by a surgeon at Louisiana Orthopaedic Specialists offers several advantages, including:

Less damage to major muscles. The direct anterior approach avoids cutting major muscles. There are fewer muscles at the front of the hip, and our fellowship-trained surgeons work between them, rather than cutting through muscle tissue or detaching muscles from bones and then having to make repairs at the end of the surgery.

Less post-operative pain. Because the surgery does not require cutting major muscles, patients typically experience less pain after surgery and require less pain medication.

Faster recovery. After surgery, a patient can bend at the hip and bear weight as soon as it is comfortable. Most anterior hip replacement patients can use crutches or a walker sooner than patients who have had a traditional surgery. Patients may also walk on their own sooner.

Decreased risk of hip dislocation. A major post-surgical concern for hip replacement patients is that the new implant (ball and socket) will dislocate. Most studies show lower dislocation rate versus the posterior approach.